Take that Kilt off before you get killed (The problem with dressing lavish).

What you wearing J’s or Adidas? What kind of shirt is that? Is that fake or real? How come I never seen that before? Sounds like a typical conversation I’d hear from time to time between various pods of black students on campus, and sometimes my friends. We as African Americans, but black men in particular, are obsessed with the latest and greatest threads. It’s not necessarily a bad thing, after all we came from greatness and our ancestors were pharaohs, kings and queens. So it makes since we’d be obsessed with the lavish things, but the way we do it today is an unhealthy habit that can make or break us alone. Plain and simple, we are obsessed with fashion, what are you wearing? So when we see our favorite artist (who would just so happen to have billions of other fans) wearing something we want and can afford or acquire it, then the story is already set in motion. Even if that means going as far wearing a crop top because we saw Kid Cudi wear one at Coachella or Lil Wayne wear jeggings (yes, actual jeggings) at the VMA’s, some people (black men included) are just so inclined to look exactly like their idol and can’t refuse the chance to even if it means dressing like a female in the process. This is how they hook the black man, if a big star like that is doing it then why can’t I? Boom, he’s hooked and thus staring a cycle of de masculizing the black male.

This site is for the sole purpose of instruction and education for MCM 211 Intro to MC & Society from the dept. of MCJR @ NSU.     (https://www.nsu.edu/)

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Who do you think you are?

A deeper delve into lyrics and how they affect black male masculinity. It’s not that hard to see how lyrics affect anyone, but black males especially are a different one. For everyone else (races other black), unless you’ve truly lived the life, the lyrics various artist say on tracks are one of either two things: something they have truly gone through or it’s something they wish or want to have went through to prove some sort of credibility. With this credibility earned, this builds up their reputation thus furthering them on whichever road they choose to be on. Some people can differentiate who is truthful and who’s just trying to make a quick buck. Little do they know however, they’re also people who truly interpret this as true and try to define their life by lyrics they heard in a song, not realizing they could never live that type of lifestyle. Some of these people, sad to say, are my fellow black brothers. We misinterpret the lyrics to propel ourselves to be something were not, and truth be told we don’t have to be. It’d be better if didn’t try so hard to be something most rappers portray themselves to be (not to put anything against any rapper), and a real rapper will tell don’t be like them. We try to over masculinize ourselves to be something greater or in a few rare cases (Lil B & Young Thug) de masculine ourselves to be something were not. You’re just as good the man you are as is the next black man; you don’t owe it to anybody to show off how masculine you are or should be. So we as black shouldn’t try to apply the lyrics we hear to show how much of a man we are or should be, history as shown that for us already.

This site is for the sole purpose of instruction and education for MCM 211 Intro to MC & Society from the dept. of MCJR @ NSU.     (https://www.nsu.edu/)

Heart of the Valley.

My personal take on the current situation African Americans, specifically black men, are in is a dire and dangerous one that needs to be addressed with a solution quickly if we want to preserve our presence as black men and African Americans overall. As an avid music enthusiast, especially Hip Hop, I’m keen to all varieties and flavors of music, from country to rap, even go-go. The problem isn’t the genre as a whole, its little aspects of Hip Hop that are jeopardizing black men. To name the important ones: lyrics, certain artist, and apparel are the major fault starters for this downward spiral we as black men are on. First and foremost, lyrics, lyrics, lyrics. We soak it, and then actually apply them to our lives (or at least try to in some aspects). I see it all the time, [insert various artist here] will say “I get money slanging’ this and cooking’ that”, and “I got H’s and B’s everywhere I go”. I see my fellow brothers recite lyrics like this all the time and think it’s the cool thing to say, and in some cases try and do (which is not the best to try in most cases). But what if the lyrics had flipped, and said something to the effect of becoming more feministic in with their lyrics and getting rid of being a strong black man. Now I’m not saying getting in touch with your sensitive side is wrong but when rappers such as Lil B or Young Thug throw in subtle but edgy lyricism as far as being a lot more feministic than normal, then there’s a problem, especially since they have a huge fan base that will affect all listeners the moment they tune in to listen. Second, certain artist in general naturally have a larger fan base than other artist, ex: Diddy, Young Thug, Lil B, and Lil Wayne. So when these artists alongside my third point, apparel come into play, this just spells out a recipe for disaster. With a fan base as big as theirs, one that can sell out Madison or break the internet with over sensationalized lyrics morphed into a hit, they can grab the attention of a good portion of just about anybody from anywhere, especially in this eccentric media age. The main key to formulate everything into the final plan is what are they wearing. That’s what we pay attention to. Hell, I’d be hypocritical if I said I didn’t. That’s one of the second things I look at next to lyrics. So when a star such as puffy throws a kilt on, or Cee Lo Green and Lil B throw a full blown black grandma going to church (earrings included), then there’s a problem. You have the fans who to be like you acting the way you do and that’s what’s detrimental to de masculine the black man.

This site is for the sole purpose of instruction and education for MCM 211 Intro to MC & Society from the dept. of MCJR @ NSU.     (https://www.nsu.edu/)

The Target of our own Creation.

How did we get in this predicament? I ask myself this question all the time. We’re the target of our own creation and they used our own people against us. But how were they successful? The answer is simple; we listen to Hip Hop so much we barely notice when a rift has been made in it. Trust me, there’s been a rift in Hip Hop and it’s not that hard to notice. Music is a universal language everyone can relate too, even if there’s nothing else we have in common. Hip Hop is one the most common and widely listened to genres of music, and mostly listened to by our people, black people. It wasn’t that hard in succeeding to cause the rift of masculine black men to a more feminine appeal. The question is why. If you can take away the black man, one of the strongest survivors on the planet, with their own creation then you can take down the rest of the black race.
This site is for the sole purpose of instruction and education for MCM 211 Intro to MC & Society from the dept. of MCJR @ NSU.     (https://www.nsu.edu/)

P. Diddy shows where he invest his money (skirts). Image 6

Hip Hop Legend & Mogul P. Diddy displays his keen sense of fashion in kilts and skirts.  Very Important to note, this is the same P. Diddy who put on with one the greatest MC’s of all time, The Notorious B.I.G. Again, what does this say to the black youth and Hip Hop as a whole?DIDDY-KILT[1]

This site is for the sole purpose of instruction and education for MCM 211 Intro to MC & Society from the dept. of MCJR @ NSU.     (https://www.nsu.edu/)